Aeration

When soil becomes compacted or waterlogged, carbon dioxide generated by the roots and microbes in the soil are trapped and fresh air cannot diffuse into the soil to provide much needed oxygen.

Poorly aerated soil leads to poor quality turf. A weak root structure makes for an unstable playing surface. the buildup of organics leads to poor drainage and a soggy field.

Oxygen-rich soil promotes healthy, strong roots. oxygen also increases the microbial breakdown of organic components in the soil, reducing unwanted conditions like poor drainage and black layer. common practices to improve the air content in the soil include venting with solid tines and core aerating – both of which are disruptive to the playing surface and of limited effect. subsurface aeration is an efficient tool that does not disrupt or stress the turf.

Aeration

Subsurface Aeration Components

The root zone soil profile is composed of solids, water and void space for air. A pressure blower is located away from the field, typically under the spectator stands.

It is connected to a special mechanism to separate the water and air being evacuated from the profile. And to the drainage network that is located under the field.

Subsurface Aeration Components
How It Works: Pressure Mode

How It Works: Pressure Mode

In the pressure mode of operation, fresh air is pushed through the drainage system and up to the surface.

Oxygen-rich air displaces carbon dioxide and other soil gases . This mode can also be used to cool the roots during a hot day.

Case Study: Moisture Removal

Subsurface aeration is also used to accelerate water removal after a rain storm. In this example, the field gravity drains slowly, leaving the field soft and potentially hazardous.

Vacuum aeration can quickly remove water from the soil profile. Quickly improving the firmness and playability of the field.

Case Study: Moisture Removal
How It Works: Vacuum Mode

How It Works: Vacuum Mode

As rainwater accumulates on and near the surface. The pressure blower draws air through the profile, pulling water down with it.

Firmer, safer playing conditions are restored and the roots are treated with fresh oxygen-rich air.

Stagnant Air

Stagnant air during a hot sunny day causes severe stress.

The boundary layer of stagnant air at the surface may be as much as 10 degrees higher than the ambient air. The leaf blade relies on convection for cooling and this is inhibited when there is no air movement.

Specially designed fans with a long throw capacity are used to stir the air and eliminate this stagnant layer.

Air moving as slow as 2 miles per hour is enough to facilitate surface cooling.

Stagnant Air
Integration With Stadium Systems

Integration With Stadium Systems

All modern stadiums have a central control room for the major building environmental systems such as lighting, heating, ventilating and air conditioning.

The control systems that we provide, including subsurface heating, subsurface aeration, and irrigation can be interfaced with building control systems.

Additionally, these systems can be connected to the internet for remote monitoring, control and troubleshooting.

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